Common causes of Prostate cancer

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Prostate cancer is a form of cancer that develops within the prostate, a gland within the male reproductive system.

Prostate cancer is like a lump in the prostate gland created by an abnormal and uncontrolled growth of cells. It’s the most common cancer in men in the UK.

Have you read? Symptoms and causes of breast cancer

Age

Prostate cancer is really rare in men under 50. More than half all cases are identified in men over 80. Age is the most important risk factor of all for prostate cancer. The older that you are, the greater the possibility. In old age, up to 8 out of 10 adult men have prostate cancer cells inside the prostate.

Sexually Transmitted diseases (STDs)

Men who’ve had gonorrhea have a better chance of developing prostate cancer, according to research in the University of Michigan Wellbeing System.

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Prostate Cancer
Prostate Cancer

Bowel cancer

Medical Research has found an increased risk of prostate cancer in men who have had colon cancer. So there may be a common faulty gene for both these types of cancer.

Ethnicity

Prostate cancer is more prevalent in black Caribbean and black African men compared to in white or Asian men. In the GREAT BRITAIN, black African and dark Caribbean men are several times more likely to produce prostate cancer than bright men. Asian men have a lower risk than bright men.

This difference looks like it’s due to a mix of inherited genes and the environmental factors. When men move from a country where the prostate cancer risk is low to at least one where it is larger their risk increases. For example, South Asian men living in Britain have a higher threat of prostate cancer than men residing in South Asia.

Obesity

Medical Research found a clear bond between Obesity and elevated prostate cancer risk, and a higher risk of metastasis and death among obese people that develop prostate cancer.

Have you read: Six (6) most common causes of Obesity?

Diabetes

Men with diabetes mellitus often have a lower risk of prostate cancer compared to average man. We have no idea why this is. Research into this issue is identifying contradictory results at the minute. But it may be something related to a change in regular insulin production in diabetes affecting the amount of a growth factor called IGF-1 inside the blood.

Have you read?

Everyday Foods for Diabetic Patients

Prevention Of High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Diet

Diet may certainly be a crucial factor in prostate cancer malignancy. The fact that Africans are much less expensive affected by prostate cancer malignancy than Americans of Africa descent suggests that diet and lifestyle are partly to guilt. Research has shown a web link between high saturated-fat diets and prostate cancer. Some experts argue that too little fruits and vegetables will be the problem, and that people with high-fat diets get more cancer because they tend not to eat enough vegetables. Along with a high-fat diet, very high calcium intake has been linked to prostate cancer malignancy.

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  1. darasi says

    age and diet are really the main causes that increase the risk of prostate cancer in men…
    and for the difference of people in country to the risk, I think their diets is what make the risk become higher or lower. After all, people such Asian always eat healthy foods almost everytimes… 🙂

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