Bananas have always been a good way to stay lean while on a diet or when watching your health, but what are the facts that surround this fruit and how beneficial are they to the body?

Many may know that this particular fruit is good in terms of nutrition, but how good are they when it comes to calories and carbohydrates?

Research states that a banana contains on average around 105 calories. The number of calories that are found is also dependent upon the size of the banana.

There are charts that can help a person who is trying to figure out the calorie intact of a particularly sized banana.

How many calories are in a banana

  • Extra small bananas that are 81 grams which are less than six inches contain 72 calories.
  • Small bananas with 101 grams that are from six to seven inches are 90 calories.
  • Medium bananas that have 118 grams and have a height of seven to eight inches are ranked at 105 calories.
  • A large banana that is 136 grams and is eight to nine inches has a calorie count of 121.
  • An extra large banana with 152 grams and is nine inches or longer, will have 135 calories.
  • Sliced bananas that are one cup and 150 grams will have a calories count of 134 calories.
  • Bananas that are 25 grams at one cup and are mashed, comes to 200 calories.
  • Ninety-three percent of a banana’s calories come from carbohydrates, while four percent is from protein, and three percent originating from fat.

This fruit is mostly comprised of water and carbohydrates which may give those who are watching their carb intake some interest. Carbohydrates just as calories is adjusted with size and thus must be measured.

How many calories are in a banana

  • Extra small bananas will contain nineteen grams.
  • Small bananas have 23 grams of carbohydrates.
  • Medium bananas will have 27 grams.
  • Bananas that are large carry 31 grams of carbohydrates.
  • Extra large contain a carbohydrate count of 31 grams.
  • Bananas that are sliced at one cup have 34 grams of carbohydrates.
  • One cup of mashed bananas have a carbohydrate count of 51 grams.

This fruit contains two to four grams of fiber, which is also dependent upon size. You can use a formula that will subtract two to four grams if interested in the content of the “net” carb which can be summed up as follows: net carbs equals total carbs minus fiber. The ripeness of a banana will also change the level of carbohydrates in a banana.

Unripe bananas have fewer carbohydrates that can be digested. They contain large numbers of starch, and most of all, resistant starch. Starch is converted to sugar while a banana is ripening. Yellow bananas have less resistant starch than their green counterpart. In fact, ripened bananas have less than one percent of starch. On average, a banana has twenty-five carbohydrates.

Resistant starch is a carbohydrate that can’t be digested and takes on the function of fiber. When it reaches the gut, it serves the purpose of providing nutrition for the bacteria located in the gut. When the bacteria digest this material, gases, and short-chain fatty acids or SCFA are produced and are important for the health of the digestive system.

95 percent of the short-chain fatty acids are absorbed in the colon by the cells and is used for energy.

Although, the calories will not be used by the digestive tract, the bacteria will transform the material into calories to be used later. Hence, green and yellow bananas will eventually provide the same amounts of calories.

Bananas have vitamins and minerals. A banana that is medium sized has 3.1 grams of fiber, 22 percent of the RDI of Vitamin B6, 17 percent of the RDI of Vitamin C, 16 percent of the RDI of Manganese, 12 percent of the RDI for Potassium, 8 percent of the RDI for Magnesium, 6 percent of the RDI for Folate, 5 percent of the RDI for Copper, and 5 percent of the RDI Riboflavin (Vitamin B2).

Bananas are a wonderful addition to the diet, and they are a good choice for a healthy and low-calorie snack.

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